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than 10,000 kilometers capable of reaching the u.s. west coast. experts used data from previous launches to make their estimate. they say a missile launched in 2009 had a range of almost 7,000 kilometers. north korean officials tried again in april. the rocket exploded shortly after takeoff. seconds longer tn those used 18 inrevious attempts. the experts believe engineers may have succeeded in reducing the size of a nuclear warhead. south korean officials say workers have completed the assembly of the three-stage missile. they say once the crew injects the fuel, it will be ready to go. authorities in pyongyang say they've launch between the 10th and 22nd of this month. they say they're sending a satellite into orbit. but leaders of japan and other countries believe the north koreans are carrying out a test of a long-range ballistic missile. the senior u.s. diplomat on north korea has warned the leadership there. he said the u.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including at the
used by telligence andbservation satellites. the object seems to be orbiting south north at an altitude of 494 kilometers kim sd the launch w aim at furthering the development of intercontinental missiles. members said the north koreans had violated u.n. resolutions. >> members of the security council condemned this launch which is a clear violation of security council resolution 1718 and 1874. >> members have agreed to keep talking about how to deal with the leadership in pyongyang. susan rice says u.s. officials apprriate action.alled rtners to she said the security council may need to impose additional sanctions. experts say one reason they went what he had the launch was to get the upper hand in negotiations with the u.s. the north koreans have developed the capability to launch missiles that could reach the u.s. mainland. i started asking about the riousness of these developments. now looking at this as a safety concern. they called the launch is provocative act. >> it undermines the global nonproliferation regime. it's regrettable that the leadership chose to take this in flagrant
natural disaster and failed bury rock sees. >> the surprise to everybody including to us is that we could do it all pretty much without batting an eye lash. >> a prominent evangelical leader reflects on 25 years in the culture wars. plus, menorahs and lighting the hanukkah lamps. >> welcome. i'm bob aber nathy. it's good to have you with us. members of congress came together for the annual lighting of the capitol christmas tree, although they were deadlocked on matters. religious groups advocated for action on the fiscal cliff and other issues. a coalition of religious leaders, law enforcement and business people urged lawmakers to prioritize immigration reform. the group included both liberal and conservative clergy who called for legislation that respects the dignitiy of immigrants and creates a pathway to citizenship and secures the border. >> it's time to secure on you values, values that include, faith and hope and charity. >> jewish groups are divided over israel's plans to construct new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. the controversial announcement came a day after
the claims are baseless. >> translator: they're using propaganda to scare people and harm our relations with north korea and other countries. >> the spokesperson acknowledged the two countries cooperated militarily in the 1980s during the iran/iraq war but he says that cooperation since then has been limited to economic areas. the second in command and mahmoud ahmadinejad agreed in september to cooperate in the field of science and technology. >>> china's new communist party leader has gone on his first tour since assuming the post last month. he's promising to carry on with the reforms of his predecessors. state-run china central television reported on xi's five-day trip. he laid flowers last saturday at the statue of the late leader. he said he'll push forward with reforms and with opening up china. xi appears to be following in dong's footsteps. the former leader visited the province 20 years ago and preached about accelerated reforms and more openness. >>> bankers are going through some troubled times these days. dirty money, bank rates manipulated, insider trading. ai joins us now
. >> what we've done is make it about us, and it's become kind of one of the biggest, gluttonous feasdaysn the christianalendar. ♪ >> welcome, i'm bob abernethy it's good to have you with us. as the country expressed outrage over the deadly shooting rampage at the connecticut elementary school--one of the worst mass shootings ever--faith leaders called for special prayers for the victims, their families, and the children who witnessed the tragedy. amid more debates on capitol hill over e so-cled fiscal cliff, religious groups continued pushing congress to reach a fair deal. several faith groups were also watching closely as the supreme court announced it would take up two important cases dealing with same - sex marriage. today, we have a special report from tim o'brien on the issues and personal stories behind these cases. one is the defense of marriage act, doma, passed by congress in 1996. the other is the famous proposition 8, in caiforni which would hav fordden same-sex marriage in that state. >> four years ago, voters in california approved proposition 8, an amendment to the stat
>>> weaker yen, stronger dollar. the u.s. currency is trading at the upper yen level. that's the highest lel in 24 months. 84.7to 75 in tokyo.trading at earlier the dollar hit 84.96 yen at one stage. investigato investors are buying yen. >> the central bank will face further pressure. >> we're going toet se more answers as the new administrati administration launches on wednesday. the ps is on. he's talking about revising the law to set target of 2%. >> we think the yen we think it's supporting for weaker yen. european debt concern should be eased things to esm. >> let's get a check on how tokyo stocks are reacting. it's currently at 10,094. a gain of 1.6% from friday's close. many analysts think the trend will continue. in other business headlines the rate of unpaid tensipensions inn hit a record high. around 26% or more than 4.5 million of those enrolled failed to pay premiums between april 2009 and march 2011. 74% said they couldn't pay because the premium is too high. 10% refuse to pay because they couldn't trust the system. the monthly premium is about $180. despite th
business is looking good for 2013, but going over the fiscal cliff could change that. >> tom: and the u.s. treasury speeds up plans to sell its stake in general motors. is the automaker ready to stand alone? >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: under the threat of a white house veto, the u.s. house of representatives is expected to vote tomorrow on the republican plan-b to avoid the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner thinks the house will okay the package, trying to turn the heat up on president obama to steer clear of automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts due to take affect in 12 days. still, as darren gersh reports, there are some signs the two sides are narrowing their differences. >> reporter: house republicans say they're still working on plan a: a big agreement with the president to cut spending and raise revenues, but they were pushing plan b today-- a tax hike for those making more than a million dollars. >> tomorrow the house will pass legislation to make permanent tax relief for nearly every american. 99.81% of the american people. then the presi
us one description of the birth of jesus. do archaeology and history give us another? joining us to answer these questions areu.s. open, the aute brand new "jesus of nazareth cunning of the and jeffrey sheler author of the brand new "is the bible truth?" >>> tell us what you think happened at bethlehem, jeffrey she'ller. >> well when we read two gospels, only two of the four gospels even talk about the birth of jesus and when we read matthew and luke, those two gospels, we are certainly presented with different details surrounding the story of the birth but despite the differences there are several things that clearly come through and those are the important aspects of the story. one, that jesus was born in bethlehem. to a virgin named mary. whose husband, joseph, was of the lineage of david. and this according to the writers of those two gospels was in fulfillment of the hebrew prophesies. so despite very clear and seemingly troubling contradictions in some of the details the more important thing is, i think, the points on which they disagree. >> on the physical -- on the physic
ground. >> susie: i'm susie gharb. the u.s. stock markeis expeed to be the world's best performer in 2013. that's the prediction of john rogers of the c.f.a. institute. he joins us tonight. >> tom: and new rules for health care also are around the corner. tonight, we look at how small businesses are preparing for the changes. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there's no deal, but the two sides are still talking. house speaker john boehner and president obama met earlier this evening at the white house in an effort to move forward the stalled fiscal cliff talks. there are now just 18 days before the tax hikes and spending cuts thatake up the clf take efft, and today, there were few signs of progress. as darren gersh reports, the tone of the talks, if anything, is getting worse. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi may just have a second career as a stock analyst. her commentary on the markets today was dead on. >> so far, they trust that we would not be so stupid as to go over a cliff. >> reporter: but pelosi made clear what everyone knows-- time is running out t
♪ >>> more yen selling. the u.s. dollar is rising further against the japanese currency on the foreign exchange market. the dollar has risen to the 85-yen level for the first time in 20 months. investors are selling yen on the tokyo foreign exchange on speculation policy makers at the bank of japan will agree to an inflation target proposed by the incoming administration. the new prime minister shinzo abe will take up office later in the day. analysts say the b.o.j. will likely further boost its monetary easing measures. the dollar is currently trading at 85.26-31 yen. ai uchida joins us now from the business desk for more on that. so ai, investors have been trading the dollar-yen quite dramatically over the last several weeks. >> that's right, catherine. just a month and a half ago that pair was trading in the mid 79-yen range. almost six whole yen weaker in just six weeks. a dramatic move indeed. so going forward, what can we expect? well, we spoke to disaburo nezo for his outlook. he is a senior executive fellow at fujitsu research institute. >> the yen's future is no
are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry reid predicted the economy would go over the cliff. speaking from the senate floor he said there's not enough time between now and the end of the year to reach a deal. but stocks erased their losses ithe final hour of trading on news that the house of representatives will reconvene on sunday night to resume talks. by the closing bell, the dow was down only 18 points, bouncing back from a triple digit loss, the nasdaq lost four, and the s&p slipped almost two points. so what happens next? and can lawmakers prevent an economic crisis by agreeing on a fiscal cliff deal? darren gersh reports. >> reporter: here is a measure of how bad things are now in washington. markets rallied on news the house will come back to work on sunday, even though there is no solution
the embargo's lifted. thomas herzfeld, of thomas herzfled advisors joins us. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! president obama says he's "modestly optimistic" a fiscal deal can be reached in time. he said he's instructed senator harry reid and senator mitch mcconnell to come up with a plan that can pass in congress. his brief comments a short while ago came after a white house meeting today with congressional leaders that ended with no deal. ahead of that, investors lost hope lawmakers can come together in the time remaining. in the last few minutes of trading, stocks sold off. the dow tumbled 158 points, the nasdaq lost 25, and the s&p fell over 15 points. here's darren gersh with more on the critical work that has to get done in washington this weekend. >> port: thpresident declared himself modestly optimistic congress could still reach an agreement to head off huge tax hikes on january first, but he also warned lawmakers to get their work done. >> the american people are not going to have patience with a self-inflicted wound on the economy. >> reporter: senate republican leader mitch
." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply managemens purchasing magers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff saut says investors seem to be ignoring bad news, and this is a bullish sign. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's happened but it's a pretty rare event it just seems to be the holiday sentiment tend to its lift stocks. i think that is what will happen this kror because i'm not one that thinks we'll fall totally off the cliff. >> tell us more. you think there is going to be some kind
on the phil buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a hethy, pductive fe. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woouff: michigan, atate consided aradlof the union movement,
fighters bhimight win the sif w. they've beenalling for more talks, but u.s. president barack obama says they recognize the opposition coalition as the only legitimate representative of the people. the head of nato thinks president assad has his back to the wall. he said the government's collapse is only a question of time. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. >> he urged syrian leaders to stop the violence, understand the situation they're in and initiate a process that would lead to realizing theegitate aspirations of the syrian people. nato officials say they won't intervene militarily. they said it could destabilize the region. instead they will increase pressure by deploying interceptor missiles along the turkey border. aid workers is say more than a million people across syria don't have enough to eat. they're warning the problem will only get worse. pedro heads the organization's new york office. he said the number of people needing help has tripled orr the st six months. >> they have serious problems in terms of having access to food. their food is not avail
that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that
debate hits the floor of the u.s. house but not much progress is made. warren buffett and others tell lawmakers to look for more money from the estate tax. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. could another major bond-buying program be on the way? what we could hear tomorrow as federal reserve policymakers wrap up their two-day meeting. >> tom: ever wonder what goes into making those cardboard store displays? tonight, we look at how one box company is using them to reinvent itself. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: an agreement to ease the fiscal cliff may not be wrapped up and waiting under your tree for christmas. senate majority leader harry reid said today it would be hard to get an agreement finished by the holiday, blaming the delay on republicans. not surprisingly, republicans say the president hasn't gotten serious about the talks. plenty of outside groups are offering up suggestions. and as darren gersh reports, they include warren buffett and some other big names in finance. >> reporter: there was some public movement in the fiscal cliff standoff today. instead of holdi
with us. as congress and the president struggle to reach an agreement on taxes and federal spending, religious leaders gathered on capitol hill to once again urge lawmakers to protect antipoverty programs. the interfaith group called cuts to those programs immoral. >> we as religious call on our country's leaders to not push the country's most marginalized peoples off the fiscal cliff, >>> palestinians celebrated this week after the united nations general assembly voted overwhelmingly to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. many jewish groups denounced the u.n. action, saying it undermines future peace negotiations with israel. some u.s. christian and muslim leaders supported the move. the palestinians were not granted full u.n. membership, but their upgraded status could allow them access to other u.n. and international bodies, including the international criminal court where they could possibly bring charges against israel. the united states was one of nine nations that voted against the resolution. >>> in egypt, seven coptic christians and a controversial american p
leadership. social activists use the internet to out leaders for corruption and treating the under class urn fairly. the leaders see this as a threat to control and clamp down on some websites. persistent chinese are still finding ways to speak out. >> reporter: in china more than 500 million use the web. they have a broad internet community. >> translator: the stock prices and the foreign sites for financial information. >> translator: i simply cannot live without my smartphone. >> reporter: also, they make some sites off limits. on the chinese site we enter a wall. the internet has given life to new movements. this is a former airport employee. now he is an internet reporter and three years ago explored production by government officials and he wants to correct injustice on social programs. like-minded people support his activities, but he has caught the eye of authorities and now they watch him. >> translator: the internet gives you lots of iormation and you can disseminate the truth. >> reporter: he supports campaigns and he says the local government is to evict with him without proper c
to 2030. they say the u.s. won't be the world's only superpower. the council says china will pass the u.s. economically a few years before 2030. the council's analysts say the u.s. will remain unrivaled in its ability to orchestrate all aspects of power including the military it the analysts say the japanese economy will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china w
you tell us? >> you're right, they can't kick up their heels just yet, because they have a handful of economic indicators to sort through for japan for november. the jobless rate improved to 4.1%. officials at the internal affairs ministry say the figure is out 0.1 program poiercentage from the previous month. separately labor ministry officials said job availability was flat. 80 positions were available for every 100 job seekers. the officials say the global economic slowdown and an end to government subsidies for eco friendly vehicles have reduced the number of jobs available in manufacturing industries. industrial output fell 1.7%, the first decline in two months. major indexes that contributed to the decrease are general machinery, fabricated metals and information technology and telecom electronics. mobile phones, drive transmission and control parts for transportation, as well as steel bridges are also key items cited for the overall decrease. the ministry says it expects the index to be up in december. analysts too say they expect industrial output will pick up as external d
-2500 people in the u.s. generally speaking a disease as rare if it afflicts fewer than 200,000 people. many of these diseases are genetic. but in truth, there's nothing rare about rare diseases. >> conditions like for instance, hearing loss or deafness, there's many genes that can -- in which mutati can lead to hearing impairment. but in one specific family an individual single gene will be responsible. so in the mixture of the phenotype of how many people can have hearing impairment it's not as rare as people think it is. the same goes for conditions like developmental delay or even birth defects. 2-3% of all children are born with a major birth defect no matter where you do the studies around the world and that is a significant% of the population. they have different kinds of birth defects and the individual birth defect might be considered a rare defect like the general heart defect or kidney defect. but actually there is many children that are born with birth defects. >> here in the u.s. there are more than 7,000 rare diseases affecting 25 million children and adults. studying the dna o
but there are families in connecticut who cannot do that tonight. and they need all of us right now. in the hard days to come that community needs us to be at our best as americans, and i will do everything in my power as president to help. because while nothing can fill the space of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need, to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, and that the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memory-- memories but also in ours. may god bless the memory of the victims. and in the words of scripture, heal the broken hearted, and bind up their wounds. >> rose: flags at the white house and the capitol are flying at half-mast in recognition of one of the worst school shootings in american history. the victims and their families are in our thoughts and prayers this evening as we air a program on a brain series about post traumatic stress disorder. after this break, our program on post traumatic disorder begins. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose comm
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is cessy withut raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add
over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elkorn ral that you couldn't see throh it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to be laid off worldwide, make up about 4% of the company's
launched a task force less than a week after a school shooting in connecticut. >> i will use all the powers of this effort to help advance e t efforts aimed at preventing a tragedy like this. >> vice president joe biden will lead the task force which will include other members of the cabinet. he said there's a growing consensus among americans to ban the sale ofilitary style assault weapons. he says it supports stricter background checks on buyers. last week a gunman walked into a school. he killed 20 children and six adults. obama has been struggling with another file. >> the u.s. fiscal cliff crisis and the republicans and democrats talks between the republicans to avert still not making much progress. president obama has rm asked to make further compromising. >> i have gone at least halfways in meeting some of the republicans concerns. what separates us is $100 milli million. >> the white house presented a comprose plan earlier is week oba'srigillan was to impose tax increases for the wealthy who make $250,000 or more a year. now he raised the threshold to $400,000 or more. republicans
ministers approved a loan just last week. now the greeks have announced one way they will use the funds. what's the latest? >> one of the requirements for greek receiving the bailout fund is they cut down their debt. they will buy back government bonds a t a discount. greek officials said on monday they will purchase the bonds from private financial institutions. they will pay 30 to 40% of the original price before the bonds mature. the announcement came a week after euro zone finance ministers agreed to offer 43.7 billion euros. that's about $57 billion. greek officials said the critor institutions will receive bonds issued by the euro zone's bail out fund instead of cash. the buy back program is a condition leaders must fulfill to receive the next cash infusion. the success depends on the bond holders. finance chiefs met in brussels to discuss how to proceed with extending eight degrees. euro president said the region's financial authorities will monitor greece's bond buying back program. he says the finance ministers will sign off in the next round of loans t greece wn they meet agai
-erian will join us. >> susie: and the legal marijuana business-- two states okaying it for recreational use. we talk with one company profiting from medical marijuana products. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: an historic move today by the federal reserve. fed chairman ben bernanke and other policy makers said they will keep their key interest rate near zero until the unemployment rate falls below 6.5% or inflation rises to 2.5%. now, this is the first time the fed has set a clear economic target for how long interest rates will stay at record lows. the surprise decision means the central bank will continue stimuting the economy by buying bonds. darren gersh explains the dramatic move. >> reporter: ben bernanke and his colleagues will no longer mark a date on the calendar for when they expect to begin raising interest rates. from now on, they'll make that call based on a target for the unemployment rate and inflation. >> it'll act to some extent as an automatic stabilizer. so if the outlook worsens and that leads markets to think that the increase in rates is further out in t
. against that backdrop, president obama announced tuesday that the u.s. will now formally recognize the syrian opposition movement. >> we've made a decision that the rian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is bng bn, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding
, it looks like u.s. consumers are doing what they do best in mid-decmber: procrastinating. how are you doing on your holiday shopping? >> pretty poorly to be honest with you. my wife typically takes care of most of it. last year, i was definitely ahead of the me. i'm probably 75% to 80% done. fantastic. haven't started yet. hoping to get a jump start on it this trip. >> reporter: retail expert mike niemira says only half of americans polled recently have finished their holiday shopping. >> the consumer is behind on their completion. that means we rely much more on the next few days for it to pick up dramatically. >> reporter: because of all the fiscal cliff doom and gloom, retailers are worried. and perhaps they should be. after all americans think their personal finances will take a hit next year. and that might mean fewer gifts under the tree. >> we believe that the post black friday lull that we've seen in the last three weeks that consumers are spending at a very restrained rate simply because they don't have the money and there's a little bit of a fear factor out there. >> reporter: but
the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obously you've got your o decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you lo at as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world and indeed for the u.s. economy and it's already had some impact on
live. small businesses that create two out of every three new jobs in the u.s. tonight you're going to meet some of the people behind those businesses and find out how they plan to keep building those businesses. we begin with the housing market, ground zero for the recession. from construction to appliance makers, when it collapsed it took a lot of very good companies down with it. but here's one that has managed to learn how to paint over the rough spots. you can brush it on, you can roll it on, you can get it on your pants. paint. the kelly moore plant in san carlos, california, turns out nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operations in the u.s. part of a $13 billion industry domestically. 140 workers in the 15 acre san carlos facility, 1,500 world wide, including 150 retail outlets in seven states. >> we own currently 58% of the stock and the rest of the stock is owned by the moore family. >> mike: you like white? they got it. you like -- they got that, too. >> still seeing a lot of reds. that teal is slipping into it. teal and turquoise. g
reflects on the tragedy in his home state and his 24 years in u.s. senate. >> there is reason for people to be angry skeptical and cynical about t willingss or capacity of congress to act or stop mass violence in our country. >> woodruff: and kwame holman remembers conservative jurist former solicitor general and failed supreme court nominee robert h. bork. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the school shootings that shook the nation sparked a new call to action at the white house today. the president vowed to have proposals ready for the new congress that convenes next month. somber scenes of mourning played out once again today in newtown, connecticut. while in washington, president obama walked into the white house briefing room named for james b
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: neither side showed signs of budging today as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to
address once again tonight. >> warner: then, ray suarez profiles three young immigrants in the u.s. illegally and seeking a reprieve from deportation. >> my values and customs are now american. so, you know, the idea of getting kicked out to korea and never come back to the u.s., i just can't even imagine this >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> warner: and we examine the growing turmoil in egypt on the eve of a referendum vote on a new constitution. >> one of the major-- has been one between islimus and nonover the future of egypt and the character ofhe nation >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broa
blame in failing to protect the u.s. diplomatic mission in libya. >> we have to do better. we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. we owe it to the security professionals who acted with such extraordinary heroism that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central ternal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred
policy. >>> in the u.s. president barack obama and republican house speaker john boehner are scrambling to avoid the looming fiscal cliff. they're trying to reach an agreement on how to tax the wealthy. the president offered to limit tax hikes for people earning more than $400,000 a year. instead of his original proposal of $250,000. but republicans are calling for more concessions. >> what we've offered meets the definition of balance. but the president is not there yet. >> boehner said he will submit a bill to the house later this week proposing higher taxes only on people with income over $1 million a year. white house spokesperson jay carney said the two sides are close to a deal. >> the president has demonstrated obvious willingness to compromise and to move more than halfway. toward the republicans. >> spending cuts and tax increases including hikes on the middle class are set to take effect in the new year. the democrats and republicans will need to reach an agreement before then or the u.s. could face a recession. >>> let's check on the markets for this wednesday morning. well,
of the financial crisis, the health of the overall u.s. economy has become the biggest concern for state economies. with state budgets already constrained, deeper cuts from the federal government could leave them in a pickle. after all, unlike the federal vernnt, statesre ruir to balance their budgets every year. ruben ramirez, nbr, washington. >> susie: still ahead, there's more to holiday spending than electronics and apparel. we'll look at one holay decorating business. >> susie: 'tis the season for procrastinators. 17 million americans were expected to hit the malls today. and the good news for merchants: many of them were simply crossing off names on their list, not bargain shopping. as erika miller reports, retailers hope they'll turn a ho-hum christmas into a merry one. >> reporter: the success of the holiday season for retailers depends on procrastinators, and also on families like the greers picking up a few extra gifts before the big day. >> we are looking for stationery, for frames. >> reporter: and that also means more gift wrap. >> we want gifts that you wonder if you really want to o
. and housing continues to be the bright spot in the u.s. economy: home prices post their biggest advance in two years. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! christmas may be over, but the holiday shopping season continues. many consumers hit the malls today to return gifts and buy what they really wanted. and this is the time many gift cards get redeemed. but for retailers, holiday sales so far have been a flop. sales in the two months leading up to christmas, rose just 0.7%, according to mastercard advisors that tracks the numbers. that's way below what the retail industry was predicting. erika miller spoke with retail expert dana telsey and began by asking what happened. >> i think there were a confluence of events, extra long season. hurricane sandy. tragedy in ct. >> none of the events out there were feel good factor events. it was all for consumer morale. >> when you look at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merchandise and how much of it are just factors beyond their control like the economy and the fiscal cliff? >> i thi
category called a typical antipsychotics. and it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new means improved. and in fact, what is really true is that needs to be established by solid evidence and not just asmption. this is a very important study for the federal government. very important study for state government. because this category of drugs is a substantial expense for the medicaid program. >> what's the cost between haldol and the new drug that came out? >> it's a difference between haldol and a entire category, the a typical antisigh cotics. it's a many expense. that doesn't mean haldol is e right drug for every patit but what this study demonstrate said when you look at a large population, for a substantial number of patients, the older now available as a generic drug, is in fact more effective at controlling symptoms than the newer category of drugs. so it just speaks to the issue of first of all, the treatment needs to be at a lord to the individual and that if -- tailored -- we need to enter into the prescribing process wi
among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religio freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight for freedom" to highlight their concerns. faith-based groups continued to be divided over economic issues. conservative activists supported massive cuts to the federal budget, arguing that it's immoral to leave debt to future generations. but broad-based interfaith coalition argued that it was immoral to make cuts that would hurt the poor. to underscore that point, a group of catholic sisters organized a project called "nuns on the bus," where they crisscrossed the country speaking out against the federal budget prop
of the new film, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own onion is tt they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,. >> rose: al hunt, julianna goldman, george stevens, paul rud, leslie mann and paul apatow when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following kohl qol captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal
of debris dotted the gulf region. >> this use to be a really big, as you can tell by the size of the slab, use to be a huge feed store, metal. it wasn't a weak building at all. you can see what it did to it. amazing. >> ifill: the same system that spawned the tornadoes dropped record snow on arkansas and texas, turning christmas lights into icicles and forcing would-be travelers to think twice. >> my mom and dad live in el paso and i was planning on going to el paso, but i think i'll be stayinhome now. >> ifill: in oklahoma, the icy conditions led to this 21-car pile-up last night. from there, the huge storm front lumbered on, bringing blizzard warnings in indiana and ohio. to the northeast, more than a foot of snow was expected from new york state to maine. by last night, it was already on the way. >> the winds were fierce it was blowing the cars around and you could see the semi's were swerving. >> ifill: the storm also forced cancellation of hundreds of flights and the ripple effects reached as far west as san francisco. >> after i found out my flight had been canceled after four hours
about cutting that and that's a frightening thought. while some of us are eating at banquets while people are starving outside our door. that's not right. >> to pass a comprehensive tax reform that would get rid of most of the deductions. not charitable deductions however, charitable deductions are critical to civil society, but to eliminate a lot of loop holes and to bring about a bipartisan effort to get the government on a sound footing. >> the principal is you've got to protect poor and vulnerable people as you find a path to fiscal sustainability. both are moral issues. >> it's hard to overestimate the importance of getting healthcare to 40 or 50 million people who did not have access to it before. that's just huge and as the wealthiest nation in the world, not to ve healthcare foall was just a profound embarrassment. >> as bishops we've been working on healthcare reform for years. now there are issues about the healthcare reform that's been passed, the affordable healthcare act, that we have concerns about, one, some of the conscience issues. >> i hope he protects religious l
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